Day 3 | El Progreso, Honduras

The most dreadful, awful, unimaginable happened to me. My camera has broke and so did my heart. Day three plans consisted of going around El Progreso to different houses to anoint the sick. I was excited to shoot some raw emotional images of these people. Once we arrived at the first house, I pulled out my camera eager as ever to capture some photographs. As I was changing my lenses two pieces of my camera flew out in tall grass. I was lucky and able to find one out of the two. I was panicked, on the verge of tears, and could not seem to fix it in any way. But then I looked up and saw the "house" that we were at. It was smaller than an average American child's bedroom. I was struck with the reality of what truly matters. There was a man sitting just inside the doorway. But there was no door, there was only a sheet. He couldn't  communicate with us because he was deaf. His mother was suppose to be there to help us communicate but she has ventured into town hoping for work to earn some money to support her son. I didn't realize at the time but that moment needed to happen to me. My camera needed to break. God was pressing on my heart and trying to tell me something I couldn't see behind the lens of my camera. I was so caught up in capturing all the right photos that I wouldn't have noticed the severity of what was really going on. Actually being in the moment... God works in the craziest ways ever. 

We headed to our next house to anoint the sick. It was about thirty minutes away. I got the first aid kit that was in the van we were riding in. I had an idea to put this piece back in my camera and make it stay together with BAND AIDS! My camera is now held together with band aids. We're back in action! It's honestly a miracle because I really can't fix much but now I feel like a pro and I can fix anything! Haha! 

We arrived at the second house to anoint the sick. The photographs below are a father and daughter. The father has an illness that he needs to get dialyses twice a week. There is no form of transportation to take them to one place to another. The bus stop is miles and miles away. If he made it, he would ride on a bus for up to an hour to get to clinic. Once you get there, you are not guaranteed to see a doctor or to get any treatment. Most likely dialyses is not available. They are on Honduran time. Which means it's super laid back and the doctor may or may not be there at 2:00 on a Monday. He never knows. We learned later in the week that he was hospitalized the next day after being anointed. Send up some prayers for this mans health and for his family.   

We headed back to Copprome to have lunch. I was on a nice carb diet pretty much the whole time I was there. Anyway, I was pumped to see the kids today because I was finally getting to know them and be comfortable around them. The rest of day was all play at Copprome.

lunch at Copprome

lunch at Copprome

washing dishes, Copprome

washing dishes, Copprome

playground, Copprome

playground, Copprome

I didn't really want to ask how they played on the see saw. It just looked way to painful. 

Jose and Dayanna, Copprome

Jose and Dayanna, Copprome

It is my third day here and I can say that I have not heard one child cry or complain. I don't know if it's because I can't speak the language and I do not know if they are complaining or not. But I am not kidding when I say these kids always have a smile on their face. 

Alex, Copprome

Alex, Copprome

.....or taking a quick nap! Haha! 

Jafet, Copprome

Jafet, Copprome

Delmy in tutoring center, Copprome

Delmy in tutoring center, Copprome

One kid did a little complaining. His name is Joseph. Little Joseph stole my heart. He had to dragged to the tutoring center to learn some English. He is such a hand full with a goofy personality. He is another kid from Copprome I had all over my Facebook throughout the week I was in Honduras. 

We gave out clothes that were generously donated to Friends of Los Ninos. This day we were giving clothes out to the girls, which was so much fun! This was hard for me though, to swallow my pride because I have always been a little bit on the selfish side and definitely spoiled. Conviction washed over me like no other since I've been here in Honduras. I loved every smile that came with a pair of pants or shoes fitting them perfectly. These girls taught me more than they will ever know. Their happiness was infectious. They have very little and can still be so to the core happy and here I am, having anything I want and not even as happy as these girls. It reminded me of "Jesus + Nothing = Everything". Happiness will never come from material, food, relationships, or how many "likes" you get on Instagram picture. It's Jesus. I am not saying that I am perfect and I have this situation all figured out. I have been away from Honduras for over a week now and I see myself slipping into my old ways. But when this happens, I remind myself of the children of Copprome. These children inspire me so much and I am so thankful to be along side these beautiful souls. 

Elisenia and Merari, Copprome

Elisenia and Merari, Copprome

Elisenia and I made Merari stop working for once to model for me. She rocked it! Haha! 

I just wrote on my blog yesterday about how I have never sweat this much in my entire life. But of course, it was such a bright idea to wear a long sleeve shirt the next day. I am full of great ideas y'all! 

-Tomorrow is intense! We visit our first of two villages. Stay tuned!

Happy Monday!